B2C and B2B Regulations | Are You Compliant?

October 11, 2017

Who are you selling to?

One of the key questions that need to be answered at the outset is “What is your marketplace?” Often as your product is developed over time the answer to this question can change. Your consumer product may turn out to be more suitable for other businesses to include as part of their products or you may find that your business product can be exploited directly to consumers. The question of whether to sell to businesses (B2B) or to Consumers (B2C)? It is fundamental in terms of product development, marketing, pricing and exploitation but most importantly, to create the correct legal terms and conditions for trading. Remember, for all your business transactions, irrespective of whether you’re trading B2B or B2C, it is wise to have contracts that cover all your business’s dealings both internally and externally. Nevertheless, B2C transactions are generally governed by much stricter consumer protection rules than B2B transactions although there are a range of rules that apply to B2B transactions as well which we will explore.

What are you selling them?

If you are selling to consumers (B2C) you must be aware of the The Consumer Rights Act 2015 (CRA), which replaced the Supply of Good Act 1979 for consumers, creates a host of rules and stiff penalties for breaching them. The CRA implies a whole range of terms (most used to be in the old Sale of Goods Act 1979) into your sales terms, for example, goods to be of satisfactory quality and fit for a particular purpose. The CRA sets the standards for supplying services to consumers with reasonable care and skill and can even affect fixing the price and the time in which to perform services.

Depending on whether you provide Goods, Services or Digital Content, there are a host of CRA requirements dealing with things such as returns, cancellations, cooling-off periods, delivery, repair and replacement that you need to be aware of. Prior to selling any of your B2C products, you must prepare your terms of sale or review your existing ones to be sure that you are compliant.
If you are supplying goods, the CRA implies the following terms (most used to be in the old Sale of Goods Act 1979) into your sales terms:

  • Goods to be of satisfactory quality
  • Goods to be fit for a particular purpose
  • Goods to be as described
  • Goods to match a sample
  • Trader to have the right to supply the goods
  • The CRA has also added new things such as:
  • Duty to provide certain pre-contract information
  • Goods must match a model seen or examined by the consumer
  • A standard for installed goods which must be installed incorrectly

Services: If you are supplying services to consumers you must perform the service with reasonable care and skill. Unless the method of fixing the price is set out in the contract, the consumer must pay a reasonable price for the services and unless the method of fixing the time it is set out in the contract, you must perform the services within a reasonable time.

Anything you say or write (about the trader or about the service) to the consumer, and which the consumer relies upon when deciding to enter the contract or make a decision about the service after the contract, is to be treated as a term of the contract.

Digital Content: Because of the CRA, Digital Content is treated similarly to goods giving a consumer buying digital content the same rights as if she was buying goods, regardless of the way in which it is supplied.

If you supply Digital Content to consumers the following terms will be implied into your terms of sale: terms as to satisfactory quality, fitness for purpose, trader’s right to supply, compliance with description and compliance with pre-contract information provided under the CRA.

Depending on whether you provide Goods, Services or Digital Content, there are a host of other CRA requirements dealing with things such as returns, cancellations, cooling-off periods, delivery, repair and replacement etc that you need to be aware of. Remember that you can get LawBite to prepare terms of sale or review your existing ones to be sure that you are compliant.

Thank you to Amna Ahmed, Software and Commercial LawBrief (LawBite lawyer). To consult with Amna about B2B or B2C regulations today you’re welcome to submit an enquiry for a FREE consultation by submitting a request here or call us today on 020 7148 1066.

2 Replies to “B2C and B2B Regulations | Are You Compliant?”

Comments are closed.